Can we end the meditation madness? - Negli USA c'è mania per la meditazione/mindfullness

Welcome my friends!

Can we end the meditation madness? - Negli USA c'è mania per la meditazione/mindfullness

Messaggioda Baraddur » 15/11/2015, 14:52



Un'opinione in controtendenza.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/10/opini ... dness.html

"Can We End the Meditation Madness?

OCT. 9, 2015

I AM being stalked by meditation evangelists.

They approach with the fervor of a football fan attacking a keg at a tailgate party. “Which method of meditation do you use?”

I admit that I don’t meditate, and they are incredulous. It’s as if I’ve just announced that the Earth is flat. “How could you not meditate?!”

I have nothing against it. I just happen to find it dreadfully boring.

“But Steve Jobs meditated!”

Yeah, and he also did L.S.D. — do you want me to try that, too?

“L.S.D. is dangerous. Science shows that meditation is good for you. It will change your life.”

Will it?

Meditation is exploding in popularity. There are classes to learn meditation in all its flavors: mindfulness-based stress reduction, transcendental meditation, Zen and more. There are meditation events with power-networking opportunities built in. Drop by The Path in New York, and you can mingle with people in tech, film, fashion and the arts. Pay a visit to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, and you get to do an early morning guided meditation with global leaders. As Arianna Huffington has said, C.E.O.s are increasingly coming out of the closet — as meditators.

Before we’re all swept into this fad, we ought to ask why meditation is useful. So I polled a group of meditation researchers, teachers and practitioners on why they recommend it. I liked their answers, but none of them were unique to meditation. Every benefit of the practice can be gained through other activities.

This is the conclusion from an analysis of 47 trials of meditation programs, published last year in JAMA Internal Medicine: “We found no evidence that meditation programs were better than any active treatment (i.e., drugs, exercise and other behavioral therapies).”

The primary reason people meditate, the experts tell me, is that it may reduce stress. Fine. But so does quality sleep and exercise. And you can reduce stress simply by changing the way you think about it. When you’re feeling anxious, it’s a signal that you care about the outcome of an upcoming event — and it can motivate you to prepare.

In an experiment led by the Stanford psychologist Alia Crum, when people had only 10 minutes to prepare a charismatic speech, simply reframing the stress response as healthy was enough to relax them and reduce their physiological responses, if they tended to be highly reactive.

In a nationally representative eight-year study, adults who reported a lot of stress in their lives were more likely to die, but only if they thought stress was harmful. Over a hundred thousand Americans may have died prematurely, “not from stress, but from the belief that stress is bad for you, ” as the health psychologist Kelly McGonigal notes.

O.K., so meditation is just one of many ways to fight stress. But there’s another major benefit of meditating: It makes you mindful. After meditating, people are more likely to focus their attention in the present. But as the neuroscientist Richard Davidson and the psychologist Alfred Kaszniak recently lamented, “There are still very few methodologically rigorous studies that demonstrate the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions in either the treatment of specific diseases or in the promotion of well-being.”

And guess what? You don’t need to meditate to achieve mindfulness either.

After spending the past four decades studying mindfulness without meditation, the Harvard psychologist Ellen Langer has identified plenty of other techniques for raising our conscious awareness of the present. For example, it turns out that you can become more mindful by thinking in conditionals instead of absolutes. In one experiment, when people made a mistake with a pencil, they had one of several different objects, like a rubber band, sitting on the table. When they were told, “This is a rubber band,” only 3 percent realized it could also be used as an eraser. When they had been told “This could be a rubber band,” 40 percent figured out that it could erase their mistake.

Change “is” to “could be,” and you become more mindful. The same is true when you look for an answer rather than the answer.

Meditation isn’t snake oil. For some people, meditation might be the most efficient way to reduce stress and cultivate mindfulness. But it isn’t a panacea. If you don’t meditate, there’s no need to stress out about it. In fact, in some situations, meditation may be harmful: Willoughby Britton, a Brown University Medical School professor, has discovered numerous cases of traumatic meditation experiences that intensify anxiety, reduce focus and drive, and leave people feeling incapacitated.

Evangelists, it’s time to stop judging. The next time you meet people who choose not to meditate, take a deep breath and let us relax in peace.

Adam Grant is a professor of management and psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, a contributing opinion writer and the author of “Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success.” "
  • 2

Baraddur
Amico level nineteen
 
Stato:
Messaggi: 1454
Iscritto il: 15/05/2013, 12:58
Località: Apolide dell'esistenza
Citazione: "Mi hanno piantato dentro così tanti coltelli che quando mi regalano un fiore all'inizio non capisco neanche cos'è. Ci vuole tempo." Charles Bukowski

"Le tre furie: paura, colpa e vergogna" Patrick Jane
Genere: Maschile

Can we end the meditation madness? - Negli USA c'è mania per la meditazione/mindfullness

Messaggioda colombabianca » 22/02/2016, 12:19



Bè, negli Usa ogni tanto scoppia una moda e tutto gira intorno a questa. Anni fa c'era la moda del New age, ora nemmeno sanno cosa sia. Adesso c'è questa specie di filone sulla meditazione che non è proprio quella meditazione che intendono i buddisti ma un metodo più terreno e più psicologico per infinocchiare chi sta passando un brutto momento. UN pò di guru in giro ormai decantano queste meraviglie per tutti ma purtroppo non hanno la profondità della vera dottrina buddista e questo mi dispiace. Che poi possa essere utile a qualcuno, così come la "raziologia" allora che ben venga :) C'è gente che legge libri manualistici su come risolversi la vita e ci riesce anche, quindi io non condanno nessuna forma di aiuto per gli altri. Certo però, quando si specula a livello economico la cosa puzza ovviamente.
  • 1

Oltre il buio c'è sempre una luce che può essere accesa se allunghi la mano sul cuore e fai uscire l'amore.
Avatar utente
colombabianca
Amico level ten
 
Stato:
Messaggi: 458
Iscritto il: 14/11/2014, 11:14
Località: treviso
Citazione: La luce apre il germoglio ma solo l'amore fa crescere l'intera pianta.
Genere: Femminile

Can we end the meditation madness? - Negli USA c'è mania per la meditazione/mindfullness

Messaggioda Baraddur » 23/02/2016, 19:41



colombabianca ha scritto:Bè, negli Usa ogni tanto scoppia una moda e tutto gira intorno a questa. Anni fa c'era la moda del New age, ora nemmeno sanno cosa sia. Adesso c'è questa specie di filone sulla meditazione che non è proprio quella meditazione che intendono i buddisti ma un metodo più terreno e più psicologico per infinocchiare chi sta passando un brutto momento. UN pò di guru in giro ormai decantano queste meraviglie per tutti ma purtroppo non hanno la profondità della vera dottrina buddista e questo mi dispiace. Che poi possa essere utile a qualcuno, così come la "raziologia" allora che ben venga :) C'è gente che legge libri manualistici su come risolversi la vita e ci riesce anche, quindi io non condanno nessuna forma di aiuto per gli altri. Certo però, quando si specula a livello economico la cosa puzza ovviamente.


Per "raziologia" intendi la teoria del sito di R. Albanesi? Tempo fa qui ci fu un utente che rimase letteralmente folgorato dalle teorie di quel personaggio, quella sorta di "guru" moderno.
  • 0

Baraddur
Amico level nineteen
 
Stato:
Messaggi: 1454
Iscritto il: 15/05/2013, 12:58
Località: Apolide dell'esistenza
Citazione: "Mi hanno piantato dentro così tanti coltelli che quando mi regalano un fiore all'inizio non capisco neanche cos'è. Ci vuole tempo." Charles Bukowski

"Le tre furie: paura, colpa e vergogna" Patrick Jane
Genere: Maschile

Can we end the meditation madness? - Negli USA c'è mania per la meditazione/mindfullness

Messaggioda Premio Nobel » 17/03/2016, 1:15



Secondo me c'è un problema con questo tipo di approcci.... qualche settimana fa mi è capitato di discutere con un mio ex compagno di liceo su argomenti simili... commentavo un video di Matthieu Ricard, che ho scoperto essere un monaco buddista, per la precisione lui mi aveva citato queste persone Krishnamurti, Ouspensky, Jon Kabat-Zinn, Eckhart Tolle ...

Il video faceva riferimento alla felicità, come il fatto che alcune di queste persone [ comme Eckhart Tolle, o Matthieu Ricard] fossero effettivamente le più felici di tutta l'umanità ( poichè osservando i valori cerebrali legati alle sensazioni di felicità, loro avevano le performance migliori in assoluto)

Sarà, ma a me sembrava un po' ipocrita, almeno come la presentava il mio ex compagno:
effettivamente è vero che queste persone hanno performance cerebrali "felicissime", rispetto al resto del mondo, ma non credo che ciò derivi tutto dalla loro abilità meditativa:
Anche alcune droghe posso favorire questi temporanei stati positivi, eppure non è detto che siano così desiderabili

Non credo però che questa sia la critica più importante, che invece secondo me è questa:
Perchè allora soltanto queste persone hanno la fortuna di essere felicissime, rispetto al resto della popolazione umana che ha un livello più "normale"?

Secondo me per i seguenti motivi:
sicuramente alcune di queste persone hanno abbracciato una filosofia che permette a loro di accettare la propria esistenza, e anche di trovare la pace e la serenità ... tuttavia ciò non significa che tutte le persone riescano, o possano fare quanto queste filosofie prescrivano....
Un po' perchè magari non hanno riflettuto abbastanza, e ci può anche stare ( va bene: non tutti siamo Kant o Hegel) --- però visto che proprio non siamo tutti Hegel, non soltanto io dovrei cercare di impegnarmi di più a comprendere, ma magari anche lo stesso Hegel a spiegarsi meglio
Però, secondo me non si può neanche buttare tutto il mondo alle ortiche: se io fossi nato in mezzo alla guerra, povero, e malato, magari anche picchiato e sfruttato fin da bambino, probabilmente avrei più difficoltà ad apprezzare la realtà e ad essere felice

Secondo me molta la nostra felicità non dipende soltanto da noi, ma anche dagli altri e da cose estranee a noi, e i soldi stessi possono fare la felicità --- quindi mi trovo d'accordo con l'articolo del NYtimes che hai postato
  • 0

Avatar utente
Premio Nobel
Amico level nineteen
 
Stato:
Messaggi: 916
Iscritto il: 12/07/2015, 17:37
Citazione: La filosofia è come la Russia, piena di paludi e spesso invasa dai tedeschi. (Roger Nimier).
Genere: Maschile

Can we end the meditation madness? - Negli USA c'è mania per la meditazione/mindfullness

Messaggioda Adrien » 16/06/2019, 21:55



Un maestro zen contemporaneo ha detto una volta che certi meditanti farebbero meglio a dedicarsi al golf. Può sembrare una battuta analoga al nostro "datti all'ippica", ma l'intenzione era invece di far riflettere su come da certe attività - che siano sportive, artistiche, o quel che vi pare - certe persone potrebbero ricavare di più che cercando inutilmente di meditare.
Non tutti sono portati a farlo, né è obbligatorio. C'è chi lo fa nel modo e con motivazioni sbagliate, rischiando anche di danneggiarsi a livello psicofisico; prima di arrivare a quello, sarebbe il caso di cercare altre strade, attività verso cui si è più portati e da cui si potrebbero ricavare maggiori soddisfazioni.
Detto questo, mi lasciano perplesso le campagne denigratorie contro la meditazione che ogni tanto tizio o caio decidono di intraprendere; gli argomenti addotti mi sembrano spesso pretestuosi, e danno l'idea di essere esposti da chi non ha mai sperimentato i benefici della meditazione, che sia per scarsa applicazione o per quella mancanza di predisposizione a cui accennavo prima. Per non parlare di chi ripete luoghi comuni già stantii trent'anni fa.
Credo che ciò a cui occorra fare davvero attenzione è se in un certo gruppo o organizzazione si pretendono più soldi del dovuto, se c'è il "culto" della personalità del maestro, se si viene sottoposti a qualunque forma di coercizione della volontà, per quanto blanda o subdola. Ecco, su cose del genere inviterei senz'altro a stare in guardia. E sono caratteristiche allarmanti anche per "gruppi" dove non si medita affatto...
  • 1

Avatar utente
Adrien
Amico level nineteen
 
Stato:
Messaggi: 1451
Iscritto il: 10/09/2016, 9:06
Genere: Maschile


Torna a International Flags

Chi c’è in linea in questo momento?

Visitano il forum: Nessuno e 1 ospite

Reputation System ©'